Tuesday, March 29, 2011

THE SEARCH FOR AN IDENTITY

Often when we write a story, verse, or tale we are at a loss for the meaning behind it. What is the thing that will grab our readers, young or old? What can we do or say about ourselves or the book?

Poetry it is said is a hard sell. Yet is that only because there isn't a exact story line to grab onto when talking about it? After all we cannot write a synopis of the story, talk about the main characters or what they go through. It is however a valid means of communication and in many ways can impart more than a story/novel can.

Lately I have spent much time looking for what WEE THREE means to me, aside from the connection between my grandmothers, mothers, and my childhood memories. What I found was surprising.I found that in each of us is the seeds to relearn the art of innocence and youthful joy.

By sharing a memory we are connecting ourself with all those generations behind us and all those yet to come.

Taking a walk, reading to a loved one, a child or an elder reconnects us all in surprising and delightful ways. We teach each other, find new joy in both them and in our

self.

What is Wee Three? It is a delightful tale of children's memories. It helps you relearn those lost arts and shows us how to connect with the world on the level that a child does, with all the beauty, joy and lesson's a child learns.

In these pages you remember, you connect with the memories of all the generations before you. You find the joy of sharing your life with others and learning about their life.

When I was doing the reading at the Clinton Senior Center a few weeks ago, I listened to the memories of those around me during the event. One 60 year old woman (a young woman by todays standards) told me that she had a fun but unremarkable childhood and had never considered that anyone would be interested in hearing about it.

A bit later she told us of her grandmother bringing out the jewelry box for her and her four sisters to play dress up. During this memory she mentioned the pop together pearls that were all the rage at the time and even through much of my childhood still around. All of a sudden everyone in the group was talking about those pop pearls and to the delight of Doris she found that she did have memories worth sharing.

Granted not all memories are good and in the childhood of each of us there is the hurtful, sad and lonely memories. Some of us have lived through horrible abuse. Yet in most there is something good to remember if we look.

For if we don't look for the hope, the good, the beauty in us and in each other then we are truly lost.

7 comments:

  1. Lovely! Thank you for sharing this.

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  2. Beautiful blog, Marta. Not only is WEE THREE such a charming, timeless, and wonderful book of verse, the fact that it is such an integral part of your family history makes it all the more special.

    Your book truly captures the innocence of childhood. It is true, not all children are lucky enough to experience childhood as it should be. I know many strong survivors who have managed to take the good and move forth into the world with it.

    Wonderful blog.

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  3. This is a wonderful post, Marta. I can't wait to read your book. It comes so highly recommended. I love your reason for writing.

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  4. There are many qualities that make some books extra special. Wee Three, encompasses the magic and beauty of day's gone by. A combined effort by - your - family, has made Wee Three an (extra special) book that will withstand the test of time. It is enjoyed now, and will be loved by future generations.

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  5. Beth, Lisette, Jen and Ross. Thank you all for the absolutely lovely comments.
    It means the world to me that you read my blog and took the time to comment.

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  6. Marta, I think your words are beautiful. Your poetry speaks volumes, and I agree with your blog. Well done, lady!

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Wee Three Book Trailer voice over Marta Moran Bishop